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Environmental Goitrogens

  • Eduardo Gaitan
Part of the Contemporary Endocrinology book series (COE, volume 2)

Abstract

At present, no less than 200 million of the world’s population have goiters and associated disorders, resulting in a public health and socioeconomic problem of major proportions (1,2). Seventy-five percent of people with goiter live in less developed countries where iodine deficiency (ID) is prevalent. Twenty-five percent of people with goiter live in more developed countries where goiter occurs in certain areas despite iodine prophylaxis.

Keywords

Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Thyroid Gland Thyroid Stimulate Hormone Iodine Deficiency Pearl Millet 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

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  • Eduardo Gaitan

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