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Resistance to Thyroid Hormone

  • Paolo Beck-Peccoz
  • Carmela Asteria
  • Deborah Mannavola
Part of the Contemporary Endocrinology book series (COE, volume 2)

Abstract

The concept of a hormone-resistant disease has been introduced around the 1940s by Fuller Albright by studying the rickets resistant to Vitamin D therapy and the “Pseudohypoparathyroidism—an example of Seabright-Bantam syndrome” (1,2).He called the disease “pseudo,” as the patients showed clinical features of hypoparathyroidism, but the injection of parathyroid hormone was not followed by the expected increases of serum calcium levels and urinary phosphate excretion. Thus, the term “pseudo” entered into the medical vocabulary to indicate an endocrine disorder resembling a known disease, but accompanied by failure of the end-organ to respond to the specific hormone. Several examples of insensitivity to many hormones, including insulin, corticosteroids, androgens, estrogens, anterior and posterior pituitary hormones, have been reported in the last 50 yr. Moreover, it is now clearly demonstrated that genetic mutations of hormone receptor proteins or proteins involved in the signal transduction are the underlying cause of most clinical conditions that we prefer today to call not “pseudo,” but “resistance to thyroid hormone action.”

Keywords

Thyroid Hormone Thyroid Hormone Action Free Thyroid Hormone Dominant Negative Activity Thyroid Hormone Resistance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paolo Beck-Peccoz
  • Carmela Asteria
  • Deborah Mannavola

There are no affiliations available

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