Advertisement

Quality Control Issues for the Clinical Molecular Pathologist

  • Daniel H. Farkas
Part of the Pathology and Laboratory Medicine book series (PLM)

Abstract

By the time you get to this chapter in this book, assuming you are reading the book in sequence, it should be clear that the tools of molecular biology have broad diagnostic applications within the clinical pathology laboratory. Furthermore, the methodology of molecular biology is also of paramount importance in the decidedly nondiagnostic field of gene therapy. This chapter describes some of the practical issues of quality control (QC) associated with generating accurate laboratory results.

Keywords

Polymerase Chain Reaction Reaction Molecular Pathology Nucleic Acid Amplification Ligase Chain Reaction Clinical Pathology Laboratory 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Farkas, D. H. Establishing a clinical molecular biology laboratory, in Molecular Biology and Pathology: A Guidebook for Quality Control, Farkas, D. H., ed., Academic, San Diego, CA, pp. 15–16, 1993.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Farkas, D. H. Quality control of the B/T cell gene rearrangement test, in Molecular Biology and Pathology: A Guidebook for Quality Control, Farkas, D. H., ed., Academic, San Diego, CA, pp. 77–101, 1993.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Farkas, D. H. Specimen procurement, processing, tracking, and testing by the Southern blot, in Molecular Biology and Pathology: A Guidebook for Quality Control, Farkas, D. H., ed., Academic, San Diego, CA, pp. 51–75, 1993.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Spadoro, J. P. and Dragon, E. A. Quality control of the polymerase chain reaction, in Molecular Biology and Pathology: A Guidebook for Quality Control, Farkas, D. H., ed., Academic, San Diego, CA, pp. 149–158, 1993.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Kwok, S. and Higuchi, R. Avoiding false positives with PCR. Nature 339:237–238, 1989.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Tsongalis, G. J. and Silverman, L. M. Molecular pathology of the fragile X syndrome. Arch. Pathol. Lab. Med. 117:1121–1125, 1993.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Liu, X.-Y, Nelson, D., Grant, C., Morthland, V., Goodnight, S. B., and Press, R. D. Molecular detection of a common mutation in coagulation factor V causing thrombosis via hereditary resistance to activated protein C. Diagn. Mol. Pathol. 4:191–197, 1995.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Crisan, D. bc1–2 gene rearrangements in lymphoid malignancies. Clin. Lab Med. 16:23– 47, 1996.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    McCreedy, B. J. Detection of viral pathogens using PCR amplification, in Molecular Methods for Virus Detection, Wiedbrauk, D. L. and Farkas, D. H., eds., Academic, San Diego, CA, pp. 175–191, 1995.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Wiedbrauk, D. L. and Stoerker, J. Quality assurance in the molecular virology laboratory, in Molecular Methods for Virus Detection, Wiedbrauk, D. L. and Farkas, D. H., eds., Academic, San Diego, CA, pp. 179–181, 1995.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Farkas, D. H. DNA Simplified: The Hitchhiker’s Guide to DNA. American Association for Clinical Chemistry, Washington, DC, pp. 7–58, 1996.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daniel H. Farkas

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations