Neural Cells in Microcultures

In Vitro Biological Assays for Neuroactive Agents
  • Marston Manthorpe


The purpose of this chapter is to introduce the reader to standard procedures for preparing microcultures of neural cells for quantification. The chick embryo was chosen as the source of neural tissue because embryos can be conveniently grown in the laboratory in large, replicate numbers with defined developmental stages and because chicken embryos are used by many laboratories as the routine source of many different peripheral and central nervous system tissues.


Neural Cell Balance Salt Solution Pasteur Pipet Central Nervous System Tissue Dilute Cell Suspension 


Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Further Reading

  1. Eagle, H. (1955), Nutrition needs of mammalian cells in tissue culture. Science 122, 501–504.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Hamburger, V. and Hamilton, H. L. (1951), A series of normal stages in the development of the chick embryo. J. Morphol. 88, 49–92.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Manthorpe, M., Skaper, S. D., and Varon, S. (1981), Neuronotrophic factors and their antibodies: In vitro microassays for titration and screening. Brain Res. 230, 295–306.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Manthorpe, M., Fagnani, R., Skaper, S. D., and Varon, S. (1986), An automated colorimetric microassay for neuronotrophic factors. Dev. Br. Res. 25, 191–198.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Mosmann, T. (1983), Rapid colorimetric assay for cellular growth and survival: application to proliferation and cytotoxic assays. J. Immunol. Meth. 65, 55–63.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Varon, S., Skaper, S. D., Barbin, G., Selak, I., and Manthorpe, M. (1984), Low molecular weight agents support survival of cultured neurons from the CNS. J. Neurosci. 4, 654–658.PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marston Manthorpe

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations