Advertisement

Design Education

  • Kenneth J. Waldron
  • Manjula B. Waldron

Abstract

The instruction of design in engineering curricula has long been controversial. New influences such as changes in industry practices, changes in the approach of the profession, as reflected in accreditation criteria, and changes in the legal and regulatory environment within which we must operate, mandate some rethinking of design instruction. Some traditional approaches continue to be useful, but new technical materials and methodologies must be incorporated into already crowded curricula. Some suggestions are provided in this chapter.

Keywords

Design Project Design Team Quality Function Deployment Design Instruction Concurrent Engineering 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Bailey, R. E. (1995). Cooperative Industry/University Design Projects and the Education of Mechanical Engineering Seniors at The Ohio State University. Working Paper.Google Scholar
  2. Beach, D. (1993). Integrated design, manufacturing and marketability. In Innovations in Engineering Design Education, Resource Guide. New York, NY: American Society of Mechanical Engineers, pp. 263–266.Google Scholar
  3. Clausing, D. (1994). Total Quality Development. New York: NY. American Society of Mechanical Engineers Press.Google Scholar
  4. Dixon, J. R. (1988). On research methodology toward a scientific theory of engineering design. Artificial Intelligence for Engineering Design, Analysis and Manufacturing (AIEDAM), 1(3).Google Scholar
  5. Engineering Accreditation Commission Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, Inc. (1994). Criteria for Accrediting Programs in Engineering in the United States,New York.Google Scholar
  6. Fleischmann, S. T. (1994). Design for recycling-Teaching environmentally responsible design. In Innovations in ME Curricula for the 1990’s. New York, NY: American Society of Mechanical Engineers, pp. 15–18.Google Scholar
  7. Gabrielle, G. A. (1994). The use of reverse engineering projects in a mechanical engineering senior design course. In Innovations in ME Curricula for the 1990’s. New York, NY: American Society of Mechanical Engineers, pp. 1–6.Google Scholar
  8. Hale, R. (1995). Quality function deployment and quality capture software. Presentation in the seminar on design and development in global market series, at the Ohio State University April 1995.Google Scholar
  9. Hoover, C. W., and Jones, J. B. (1991). Improving Engineering Design: Designing for Competitive Advantage. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.Google Scholar
  10. Innovations in Engineering Design Education (1993). Resource Guide. New York, NY: American Society of Mechanical Engineers.Google Scholar
  11. Issii, K., Eubanks, F., and Beiter, K. (1994). ME 883 Life-Cycle Design Course notes. Mechanical Engineering Department, The Ohio State University. Columbus, Ohio.Google Scholar
  12. Koen, B. V. (1994). Toward a strategy for teaching engineering design. J. Engineering Education, 83 (3), 193–202.Google Scholar
  13. Roeder, C. L. (1994). Teaching engineering and business in parallel. In Innovations in ME Curricula for the 1990’s. New York, NY: American Society of Mechanical Engineers, pp. 11–13.Google Scholar
  14. Ullman, D. G. (1992). The Mechanical Design Process. New York: McGraw-Hill.Google Scholar
  15. Ulrich, K. T., and Eppinger, S. D. (1995). Product Design and Development. New York: McGraw-Hill.Google Scholar
  16. Waldron, K. J. (1992). Secret confessions of a designer. Mechanical Engineering, 114 (11), 60–62.Google Scholar
  17. Ward, A. C. (1994). The second Toyota paradox. Proceedings of ASME Design Theory and Methodology Conference, DE-68 American Society of Mechanical Engineers, New York, pp. 79–90.Google Scholar
  18. Wesner, J. W., Hiatt, J. M., and Trimble, D. C. (1994). Winning with Quality, Reading, MA: Addison Wesley.Google Scholar
  19. Wilson, C. C., and Speckhart, F. H. (1994). Superior engineering design program. In Innovations in ME Curricula for the 1990’s. New York, NY: American Society of Mechanical Engineers, pp. 27–29.Google Scholar
  20. Wolk, A. A. (1993). Product liability: A plaintiffs’ lawyer responds. AOPA Pilot, June, pp. 117–119.Google Scholar
  21. Yodice, J. S. (1992). Product liability: A case study. AOPA Pilot, December, pp. 127–128.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kenneth J. Waldron
  • Manjula B. Waldron

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations