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Bladder

  • Ralph H. Hruban
  • William H. Westra
  • Timothy H. Phelps
  • Christina Isacson

Abstract

Biopsies of the urinary bladder are generally taken through the cystoscope. They vary from single and minute to numerous, large, and papillary. Orientation of these specimens is generally impossible, even for the larger papillary fragments. Biopsies of neoplasms potentially hold important information regarding tumor type, tumor grade, and extent of tumor invasion into the various layers of the bladder wall. By following two simple rules, you can avoid missing this crucial information. First, be sure to submit all of the pieces of tissue for processing and multiple sectioning. Second, avoid the common mistake of overfilling specimen cassettes with tissue fragments. Keep in mind that portions of the specimen will not be sampled if they are “buried” within a crowded cassette. In addition, we strongly recommend that the urologist submit superficial and deep tumor biopsies as separate specimens to facilitate the detection of deep muscle invasion.

Keywords

Bladder Wall Muscularis Propria Ureteral Orifice Prostatic Urethra Partial Cystectomy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Murphy WM, Beckwith JB, Farrow GM. Atlas of Tumor Pathology: Tumors of the Kidney, Bladder, and Related Structures. 3rd series, fascicle 11. Washington, DC: Armed Forces Institute of Pathology; 1994.Google Scholar
  2. Skinner DG. Current state of classification and staging of bladder cancer. Cancer Res. 1977; 37: 2838–2842.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. Young RH, ed. Contemporary Issues in Surgical Pathology: Pathology of the Urinary Bladder. New York, NY: Churchill Livingstone; 1989.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ralph H. Hruban
    • 1
  • William H. Westra
    • 1
  • Timothy H. Phelps
    • 2
  • Christina Isacson
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Pathology Meyer 7-181The Johns Hopkins HospitalBaltimoreUSA
  2. 2.Department of Art as Applied to Medicine, School of MedicineThe Johns Hopkins UniversityBaltimoreUSA
  3. 3.Department of PathologyVirginia Mason Medical CenterSeattleUSA

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