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Program Evaluation

  • John G. Bruhn
  • Howard M. Rebach
Part of the Clinical Sociology book series (CSRP)

Abstract

Throughout our discussions of intervention, we have consistently maintained the importance of program evaluation as an integral part of the intervention process. The purpose of this chapter is to focus specific attention on the evaluation stage. It should be noted that program evaluation is almost a discipline in itself and many sociologists and other social scientists are often employed as program evaluators. Their task is to evaluate ongoing programs for clients who call upon them for this specific activity. This chapter is not intended to be a treatise on program evaluation from that perspective. Here, our concern will focus on a subset of the broader world of program evaluation: program evaluation as a part, a stage in an overall intervention. That is, we direct your attention to the situation where the clinical sociologist works with a specific client/client system to design and implement a specific problem-solving intervention.

Keywords

Program Evaluation Causal Inference Target Audience Criterion Measure Impact Evaluation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Babbie, E. (1986). The practice of social research. (4th ed.). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth.Google Scholar
  2. Campbell, D.T., & Stanley, J.C. (1963). Experimental and quasi-experimental designs for research. Chicago: Rand-McNally.Google Scholar
  3. Guba, E.G., & Lincoln, Y.S. (1989). Fourth generation evaluation. Newbury Park, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
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  7. Shadish, W.R. Jr., Cook, T.D., & Leviton, L.C. (1991). Foundations of program evaluation: Theories and practice. Newbury Park, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
  8. Weiss, C.H. (1972). Evaluation research: Methods for assessing program effectiveness. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall.Google Scholar

Recommended Readings

  1. Guba, E.G., & Lincoln, Y.S. (1989). Fourth generation evaluation. Newbury Park, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
  2. Orlandi, M.A., Weston, R., & Epstein, L.G. (Eds.). (1992). Cultural competence for evaluators. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Office of Substance Abuse Prevention. DHHS Publication No. (ADM)92–1884.Google Scholar
  3. Shadish, W.R. Jr., Cook, T.D., & Leviton, L.C. (1991). Foundations of program evaluation: Theories and practice. Newbury Park, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
  4. Weiss, C.H. (1972). Evaluation research: Methods for assessing program effectiveness. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-HallGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • John G. Bruhn
    • 1
  • Howard M. Rebach
    • 2
  1. 1.Pennsylvania State University / HarrisburgMiddletownUSA
  2. 2.University of Maryland, Eastern ShorePrincess AnneUSA

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