Effect of Exercise Training and Acute Exercise on Essential Hypertensives

  • R. D. Dibner
  • M. M. Shubin
  • N. Taylor-Tolbert
  • D. R. Dengel
  • S. D. McCole
  • M. D. Brown
  • J. M. Hagberg
Chapter

Abstract

Hypertension is a major health problem in the United States and Russia, as well as around the world. Essential hypertension, defined as a blood pressure(BP)> 140/90 mmHg, is present in approximately 20% of adults in industrialized societies and these prevalence rates rise sharply with age (10). Hypertension is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease, particularly coronary artery disease (13). Numerous studies indicate that endurance exercise training lowers BP in individuals with mild essential hypertension (BP 140–180/90–105mmHg) with the reduction averaging approximately 10 mmHg for both systolic and diastolic pressure (7,14).However, little is known about this response in women (6).

Keywords

Depression Cardiol 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. D. Dibner
    • 1
  • M. M. Shubin
    • 1
  • N. Taylor-Tolbert
    • 1
  • D. R. Dengel
    • 1
  • S. D. McCole
    • 1
  • M. D. Brown
    • 1
  • J. M. Hagberg
    • 1
  1. 1.Preventive CardiologyUPMC, PittsburghUSA

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