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In Vitro and In Vivo Release of Naltrexone from Two Types of Poly(lactide-co-glycolide) Matrices

  • Joseph D. Gresser
  • Debra J. Trantolo
  • Charles H. Lyons
  • Hisanori Nagaoka
  • Louis Shuster
  • Robert M. Swift
  • Donald L. Wise
Chapter

Abstract

With the identification of opioid receptors in the brain as well as endogenous peptide opioids, the potential of narcotic antagonists for altering behavior patterns is exciting, increasing research interest. Recent work in veterinary medicine has explored narcotic antagonists in treatment of stereotype behavior, such as crib biting by horses (1,2) and scratching and licking syndrome by dogs (3). In a study with pigs, naltrexone has been shown to increase latency time for relaxation induced by flank pressure (4).

Keywords

Tail Flick Foam Formulation Foam Density Tail Flick Test Percent Release 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joseph D. Gresser
  • Debra J. Trantolo
  • Charles H. Lyons
  • Hisanori Nagaoka
  • Louis Shuster
  • Robert M. Swift
  • Donald L. Wise

There are no affiliations available

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