Structure: Organizing Your Documents

  • Michael Alley


When discussing the organization of documents, Aristotle said, “A whole is that which has a beginning, middle, and ending” This approach is a good way to examine the organization of general scientific documents, such as reports and articles.


Diesel Engine Nitrogen Oxide Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Descriptive Summary Scientific Writing 


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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael Alley
    • 1
  1. 1.Mechanical Engineering, Electrical and Computer EngineeringVirginia TechBlacksburgUSA

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