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Using Computers in Basic Nursing Education, Continuing Education, and Patient Education

  • Margaret J. A. Edwards
Part of the Health Informatics book series (HI)

Abstract

As the use of computers and information science in nursing practice, education, and administration increases, the need also increases for nurses who possess the skill and knowledge to use and manage information technology in nursing environments. Our task as nursing educators is changing. Our new responsibility is to teach our students and colleagues to become discriminating users of information. Nurses need to have expertise in the use of computer-based information systems in the healthcare organizations and agencies in which they are employed. They must also come to use the technology as a tool to practice their chosen profession rather than practicing their profession to suit the needs of technology. In the delivery of health care, nurses have traditionally provided the interface between the client and the healthcare system. They will fulfill this function in new ways in a technologically advanced environment.

Keywords

Nursing Student Nursing Education Staff Development Educational Software Instructional Software 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Margaret J. A. Edwards

There are no affiliations available

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