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Academic Preparation in Nursing Informatics

  • Carole A. Gassert
Part of the Health Informatics book series (HI)

Abstract

The dream of many professional nurses is to become involved in an initiative with tremendous potential for impacting the outcomes of healthcare delivery. Nursing informatics (NI) is such an initiative. Its activities are positioned to facilitate nursing’s entry, along with other healthcare providers, onto the information highway. Informatics practitioners, including nurses, are being sought to help employers manage information competitively. Increased interest in information technology and informatics specialists will allow even more nurses to contribute to the development and implementation of information structures and tools needed to deliver effective and efficient care in a constantly changing healthcare environment. What an exciting initiative informatics is for nurses!

Keywords

Nursing Practice Doctoral Program Academic Preparation National League Role Component 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Carole A. Gassert

There are no affiliations available

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