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Determining Nursing Data Elements Essential for the Management of Nursing Information

  • Kathryn J. Hannah
  • Betty J. Anderson
Part of the Health Informatics book series (HI)

Abstract

This chapter explores nursing’s role in managing nursing information. It focuses on international efforts at identification of essential nursing data elements, development of minimum health data sets, and use of nursing information. Factors related to the role of the nurse in information management and obstacles to effective nursing management of information have been detailed elsewhere in this book as well as in other publications (Hannah and Anderson, 1994). The issues for all nurses relate to information and information management, and the salient issue is identification of nursing data elements that are essential for collection and storage in national health databases.

Keywords

Data Element Minimum Data Nursing Intervention Client Status National League 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kathryn J. Hannah
  • Betty J. Anderson

There are no affiliations available

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