Advertisement

Aye-Aye Conservation: The Role of the Jersey Wildlife Preservation Trust

  • Anna T. C. Feistner
  • J. Bryan Carroll
Chapter

Abstract

Gerald Durrell founded his Zoo for the breeding of endangered species in 1959, on the island of Jersey in the British Channel Islands. Four years later, in 1963, the Jersey Wildlife Preservation Trust (JWPT) was founded. In 1973 Wildlife Preservation Trust International (WPTI), based in the USA, was formed, and in 1985 Wildlife Preservation Trust Canada (WPTC). These three organisations, collectively known as the Wildlife Preservation Trusts (WPTs), work to help preserve species threatened with extinction.

Keywords

Captive Breeding Light Change Captive Breeding Program Female Subadult Leafy Branch 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Beattie, J.B., Feistner, A.T.C., Adams, N.M.O., Barker, P., & Carroll, J.B. (1992). First captive breeding of the aye-aye Daubentonia madagascariensis. Dodo, Journal of the Wildlife Preservation Trusts, 28, 23 – 30.Google Scholar
  2. Carroll, J.B. & Beattie, J.C. (1993). The maintenance and husbandry of aye — ayes Daubentonia madagascariensis at the Jersey Wildlife Preservation Trust. Dodo, Journal of the Wildlife Preservation Trusts, 29, 45 – 54.Google Scholar
  3. Coffey, P. (1992). Report of the International Zoo Educator Training Course held at the Jersey Wildlife Preservation Trust in 1991. Dodo, Journal of the Wildlife Preservation Trusts, 28, 14 – 22.Google Scholar
  4. Curtis, D.J. (1992). Substrate use in captive aye — ayes Daubentonia madagascariensis. Dodo, Journal of the Wildlife Preservation Trusts, 28, 30–44.Google Scholar
  5. Curtis, D.J. & Feistner, A.T.C. (1993). Positional behaviour in captive aye — ayes Daubentonia madagascariensis, Creatures of the Dark, The Nocturnal Prosimians, Duke University. Abstract.Google Scholar
  6. Curtis, D.J. & Feistner, A.T.C. (in press). Positional behaviour in captive aye — ayes Daubentonia madagascariensis, Folia Primatologica. Google Scholar
  7. Durrell, L. (1991). Notes on the Durrell Expedition to Madagascar September-December 1990. Dodo, Journal of the Jersey Wildlife Preservation Trust, 27, 9–18.Google Scholar
  8. Feistner, A.T.C. & Ashbourne, C. (1993). Infant development in a captive — bred aye — aye Daubentonia madagascariensis over the first 24 weeks of life, Creatures of the Dark, The Nocturnal Prosimians, Duke University. Abstract.Google Scholar
  9. Feistner, A.T.C. & Ashbourne, C. (in press). Infant development in a captive — bred aye — aye Daubentonia madagascariensis over the first year of life. Folia Primatologica. Google Scholar
  10. Feistner, A.T.C. & Carroll, J.B. (1993a). Captive breeding of the aye-aye, Daubentonia madagascariensis. Primate Eye 49:16–17.Google Scholar
  11. Feistner, A.T.C. & Carroll, J.B. (1993b). Breeding aye — ayes: an aid to preserving biodiversity. Biodiversity and Conservation, 2, 283–389.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Feistner, A.T.C., Price, E.C. & Milliken, G. (submitted). Hand preference patterns for tapping, digit feeding, and food holding in captive aye-ayes Daubentonia madagascariensis. Folia Primatologica. Google Scholar
  13. Feistner, A.T.C., & Price, E.C. (1992). Behavioural research on captive aye — ayes, Daubentonia madagascariensis, at the Jersey Wildlife Preservation Trust. Abstracts of the XIVth Congress of the International Primatological Society: 203. Abstract. Price, E.C. & Feistner, A.T.C. (in press) Responses of captive aye — ayes (Daubentonia madagascariensis) to the scent of conspecifics: A preliminary investigation. Folia Primatologica. Google Scholar
  14. Waugh, D.R. (1983). The Wildlife Preservation Trust Training Programme. Dodo, Journal of the Jersey Wildlife Preservation Trust, 20, 12–16.Google Scholar
  15. Waugh, D.R. (1985). The Training Programme: Assistance, assessment and reconnaissance, Dodo, Journal of the Jersey Wildlife Preservation Trust, 22, 12–18.Google Scholar
  16. Waugh, D.R. & Wemmer, C. (1994). Training in zoo biology: Two approaches to enhance the conservation role of zoos in the tropics. In P.J. Olney, G.M. Mace & A.T.C. Feistner (Eds.), Creative Conservation: Interactive Management of Wild and Captive Animals (pp. 207–240). London: Chapman and Hall.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Welsh, C. & Katz, A. (1992). Survey and census work on lemurs in the Natural reserve of Betampona in eastern Madagascar with a view to restocking. Dodo, Journal of the Wildlife Preservation Trusts, 28, 45 – 58.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anna T. C. Feistner
    • 1
  • J. Bryan Carroll
    • 1
  1. 1.Les Augrès Manor, TrinityJersey Wildlife Preservation TrustJerseyChannel Islands, British Isles

Personalised recommendations