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Phylogenetic Studies of Glutathione-Metabolizing Enzymes in Primate Lenses

  • William B. Rathbun
Chapter

Abstract

Morphological characteristics of the nose are aids which have been used to differentiate between the strepsirhines and haplorhines and also between the catarrhines and platyrrhines. However, application of characteristics of a second sense organ, the eye, to primate classification does not seem to have occurred. In part, this may be due to the minute fund of comparative data that presently exists. The lens is the simplest ocular organ. It varies greatly between species regarding gross characteristics such as color, shape and size. The variation in size is in both actual values and relative values as a proportion of the body mass. Of the many tissues and organs which make up the primate eye, the clear ocular lens has perhaps been the most charismatic, its fibrillar structure even serving as a subject for Leeuwen-hoek’s microscopic studies.

Keywords

World Monkey GSHPx Activity Mouse Lemur Human Lens Glutathione Reductase Activity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • William B. Rathbun
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Ophthalmology, Lions Research BuildingUniversity of MinnesotaMinneapolisUSA

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