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Colloidal Aspects of Colorants in Relation to Aqueous Printing

  • George F. Sonn
Chapter

Abstract

Aqueous printing inks can be presented as a model colloidal system that encompasses many classical colloidal concepts. Organic pigments which comprise the bulk of the pigments utilized in aqueous printing inks are composed of large surface area. For an aqueous system, the surface is much more active than the same system in an organic solvent media. Organic pigments, to be useful as coloring agents, must be in a dispersed form in the final ink. Dispersion involves the dual mechanics of surface wetting and particle size reduction. Surface wetting can be affected by both pigment pretreatments during the manufacture of the pigment and the post treatments of surface by addition of the agents.

Keywords

Zeta Potential Paint Film Methyl Violet Pigment Particle Pigment Surface 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • George F. Sonn
    • 1
  1. 1.Tritech, Inc.BurlingtonUSA

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