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Liability of Health Care Ethics Consultants

  • Larry Lowenstein
  • Jeanne DesBrisay
Chapter
Part of the Contemporary Issues in Biomedicine, Ethics, and Society book series (CIBES)

Abstract

This chapter is a result of cooperation between the members of the SSHRC Network and the law firm of Osier, Hoskin & Harcourt.

Keywords

Mental Distress Ethic Consultation Legal Liability Ethic Consultant General Medical Practitioner 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes and References

  1. 1.
    This chapter was prepared with the assistance of Laura Fric, summer student at Osler, Hoskin and Harcourt in 1992. The discussion in this chapter is necessarily of a general nature and cannot be regarded as legal advice. The authors will be pleased to provide additional details on request and to discuss the possible effect of these matters in specific situations.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
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  3. 3.
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    John A. Robertson, “Clinical Medical Ethics and the Law: The Rights and Duties of Ethics Consultants,” Ethics Consultation in Health Care, eds. John C. Fletcher, Norman Quist, and Albert R. Jonsen (Ann Arbor, MI: Health Administration, 1989) 165, 166.Google Scholar
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  6. 6.
    See Hopp v.Lepp [1980] 2 S.C.R. 192; 13 C.C.L.T. 66 and Reibl v. Hughes [1980] 2 S.C.R. 880; 14 C.C.L.T. 1.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    John G. Fleming, The Law of Torts, 6th ed. ( Sydney: Law Book, 1983 ) 23.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Reibl v. Hughes.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Reibl v. Hughes, at C.C.L.T. p. 14.Google Scholar
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  11. 11.
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  12. 12.
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  13. 13.
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  14. 14.
    lnnes v. Wylie (1844), 1 C. and K. 257.Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    This chapter will continue to discuss the liability of a health care ethics consultant and all remarks will apply equally to a health care ethics committee unless otherwise stated.Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    ] A.C. 562 at 580.Google Scholar
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    Arthur J. Meagher, Peter J. Marr, and Ronald A. Meagher, Doctors and Hositals: Legal Duties ( Toronto: Butterworths, 1991 ) 179.Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    Robertson (166–168), comes to this conclusion and goes on to examine the potential legal duties of ethicists.Google Scholar
  19. 19.
    R.S.O. 1990, c. F.3.Google Scholar
  20. 20.
    O.R. 132 at p. 143.Google Scholar
  21. 21.
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  22. 22.
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    Robertson 166.Google Scholar
  24. 24.
    Rietze v. Bruser (No.2), [ 1979 ] 1 W.W.R. 31 at 45 ( Man. Q.B. ).Google Scholar
  25. 25.
    Ellen Picard, Legal Liability of Doctors and Hospitals in Canada, 2nd ed. (Toronto: Butterworths, 1984) 156,157.Google Scholar
  26. 26.
    Gibbons v. Harris, [ 1924 ] 1 D.L.R. 923 ( Alta. C.A. ).Google Scholar
  27. 27.
    Gilbert Sharpe, The Law and Medicine in Canada, 2nd ed. (Toronto: Butterworths, 1987) 19,20.Google Scholar
  28. 28.
    Wilson v. Swanson (1956), 5 D.L.R. (2d) 113 at 120, per Rand, J.Google Scholar
  29. 29.
    White u. Turner (1981), 120 D.L.R.(3d) 269 at 278.Google Scholar
  30. 30.
    C.C.L.T. (2d) 319 (B.C. S.C.).Google Scholar
  31. 31.
    [1957], 2 All E.R. 118 (Q.B.), at p. 122.Google Scholar
  32. 32.
    [1956], O.R. 257 at 265.Google Scholar
  33. 33.
    [1956] O.R. 132 at 150 (Ont. C.A.), aff’d [ 1956 ] S.C.R. 991 at 997.Google Scholar
  34. 34.
    [1949] 2 W.W.R. 337, aff’d [1950] 4 D.L.R. 223 (S.C.C.), at p. 359.Google Scholar
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  36. 36.
    The extent of ethical training varies considerably among medical schools. See Françoise Baylis and Jocelyn Downie, Undergraduate Medical Ethics Education: A Survey of Canadian Medical Schools ( London: Westminster Institute for Ethics and Human Values, 1990 ) 30.Google Scholar
  37. 37.
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    Snell v. Farrell (1990), 72 D.L.R. (4th) 289 at p. 300.Google Scholar
  41. 41.
    Videto v. Kennedy (1981), 33 O.R. (2d) 497, 17 C.C.L.T. 307 (C.A.); Zimmer v. Ringrose (1981), 16 C.C.L.T. 51, leave to appeal to S.C.C. denied.Google Scholar
  42. 42.
    D.L.R. (2d) 492 at 494.Google Scholar
  43. 43.
    [1966] S.C.R. 561 at 579.Google Scholar
  44. 44.
    Fleming 105.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Larry Lowenstein
  • Jeanne DesBrisay

There are no affiliations available

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