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Confocal Myography: Applications for the Study of Resistance Arteries

  • S. M. Arribas
  • C. J. Daly
  • J. F. Gordon
  • J. C. McGrath
Part of the Experimental Biology and Medicine book series (EBAM, volume 26)

Abstract

The development of confocal microscopes has enabled the collection and reconstruction of serial ‘optical’ sections of labelled unfixed specimens (1). Using fluorescent nuclear dyes and conventional fluorescence microscopy it is possible to identify cell type, location and viability within living myograph-mounted resistance arteries (2). We have now extended this technique using confocal microscopy and a variety of intracellular and extracellular stains. Many in-vitro experiments on resistance arteries rely on the integrated response of all of the cells in an isolated segment. This response may be either a change in diameter, isometric force or total fluorescence of a given indicator. It has been our aim to develop techniques which will allow visualisation of individual cells within a myograph mounted vessel in order to assess each cell’s activity. We have now identified a number of possible methods which may help to answer some of the questions which cannot be addressed using currently available techniques.

Keywords

Resistance Artery Frame Average Physiological Salt Solution Conventional Fluorescence Microscopy Mesenteric Resistance Artery 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    The handbook of biological confocal microscopy 1989. Ed J. Pawley, IMR press, Madison, WI 53706 U.S.A.Google Scholar
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    Daly, C.J., Gordon, J.F. & McGrath, J.C. (1992). The use of fluorescent nuclear dyes for the study of blood vessel structure and function: novel applications of existing techniques. J. Vasc Res. 29: 41 - 48PubMedGoogle Scholar
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    Aalkjaer, C & Hughes, A. (1991). Chloride and bicarbonate transport in rat resistance arteries. J. Physiol. (Lond.) 436; 57 - 74Google Scholar
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    Matthews, J.G., Graves, J.E. & Poston, L. (1992). Relationships between pHi and tension in isolated rat mesenteric resistance arteries. J. Vasc. Res. 29; 330 - 340PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Daly, C.J., Gordon, J.F. & McGrath, J.C. (1994). The use of confocal microscopy for the study of resistance artery structure and function. J. Vasc. Res. 31, Si, 018.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. M. Arribas
    • 1
  • C. J. Daly
    • 1
  • J. F. Gordon
    • 1
  • J. C. McGrath
    • 1
  1. 1.MRC Clinical Research Initiative, Institute of PhysiologyUniversity of GlasgowGlasgowUK

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