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The Use of Public Crash Data in Biomechanical Research

  • Charles P. Compton

Abstract

One of the primary contributors to the injury problem is the automobile crash. Information collected about crashes has the potential to aid researchers in understanding the mechanisms of injuries and to point the way to possible solutions. Unlike the laboratory experiment, in which all variables are measured, held constant, or monitored, most variables in an automobile collision are not monitored and are changing rapidly.

Keywords

Abbreviate Injury Scale Neck Injury Police File American National Standard Institute Accident Data 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Bibliography of Crash Data Files and Related Documentation

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Charles P. Compton

There are no affiliations available

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