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Child Passenger Protection

  • Kathleen Weber

Abstract

Child restraint systems function in much the same way as occupant protection systems for adults, with a few important differences. For the average child restraint user, the primary difference is the wide variety of systems from which to choose. Children of different ages and sizes require different types of restraints, and, among each type, the way in which they are used can be critical for effective performance. This chapter describes the theory behind the design of restraint systems, relates these principles to the various types of child restraint systems available today, and indicates the circumstances in which children in these restraints may still be injured, particularly when the child restraints are misused. Finally, the issues of child injury potential and biomechanically based injury criteria are addressed, and research needs are identified.

Keywords

Seat Belt Neck Injury Restraint System Rear Seat Frontal Crash 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kathleen Weber

There are no affiliations available

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