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Sex Differences in Interaction Style in Task Groups

  • Wendy Wood
  • Nancy Rhodes
Chapter

Abstract

Among the many definitions of groups, a common theme is that members of groups interact with one another and are influenced by each other (Forsyth, 1990; Hare, 1976; McGrath, 1984; Shaw, 1981). Conceptual analyses of group dynamics have echoed this emphasis on interaction. The classic input-process-output perspective identifies interaction process as the key mediator between inputs such as member attributes or task requirements and outputs such as task productivity or patterns of influence (e.g., Hackman & Morris, 1975; McGrath, 1964; Shiflett, 1979).

Keywords

Task Group American Sociological Review Interaction Style Task Behavior Social Role Theory 
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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wendy Wood
  • Nancy Rhodes

There are no affiliations available

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