The Costs of Reducing U.S. CO2 Emissions: Further Sensitivity Analyses

  • Alan S. Manne
  • Richard G. Richels
Part of the Environmental Science Research book series (ESRH, volume 45)


In a previous paper, we used the Global 2100 model to explore the implications of a carbon constraint upon domestic energy costs and the resulting effects on the U.S. economy as a whole (Manne and Richels, 1990). The impact of a CO2 limit will depend on the technologies and resources available for meeting demands as well as on the demands themselves. Given the enormous uncertainty surrounding these factors, losses were calculated under alternative assumptions about each.


Carbon Emission Energy Efficiency Improvement Carbon Limit Electric Power Research Institute Synthetic Fuel 


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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alan S. Manne
    • 1
  • Richard G. Richels
    • 2
  1. 1.Stanford UniversityStanfordUSA
  2. 2.Energy Analysis and Planning DepartmentElectric Power Research InstitutePalo AltoUSA

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