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Biomaterials pp 317-354 | Cite as

Hard Tissue Replacement II: Joints and Teeth

  • Joon B. Park
  • Roderic S. Lakes

Abstract

The articulation of joints poses some additional problems as compared with long bone fracture repairs. These include wear and corrosion and their products, as well as complicated load transfer dynamics. In addition, the massive nature of the (total) joint replacements such as the knee and the elbow and their proximity to the skin also renders the greater possibility of infection. More importantly, if the replacement fails for any reason, it is much more difficult to replace the joint a second time since a large portion of the natural tissue has already been destroyed.

Keywords

Femoral Head Bone Cement Joint Replacement Total Knee Replacement Dental Implant 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joon B. Park
    • 1
  • Roderic S. Lakes
    • 1
  1. 1.The University of IowaIowa CityUSA

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