Advertisement

Convening the Family

How, When, and to What End?
  • Susan H. McDaniel
  • Thomas L. Campbell
  • David B. Seaburn

Abstract

Bringing the family of a patient together for a family meeting or conference is a basic skill that is essential for family-oriented medical care. Why convene the family? Although one can obtain a considerable amount of information about the family from an individual patient, we believe that it is often essential to assemble the family to assess adequately the patient and family system. The extra time and effort involved in arranging family conferences is usually minimal and repays itself many times over. The health care provider can obtain a more thorough assessment of a specific problem, determine the impact on the family, negotiate a comprehensive treatment plan, and obtain the family’s assistance in carrying out that plan.

Keywords

Family Member Chronic Illness Home Visit Family Therapy Psychosocial Problem 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Christie-Seely J: Working With the Family in Primary Care. New York: Praeger, 1984.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Doherty W, Baird MA: Family Therapy and Family Medicine. New York: Guilford Press, 1983.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Schmidt DD: When is it helpful to convene the family? J Fam Pract 1983; 16: 967–973.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Kushner K, Meyer D, Hansen M, Bobula J, Hansen J, Pridham K: The family conference: What do patients want? J Fam Pract 1986; 23: 463–467.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Kushner K, Meyer D, Hansen JP: Patients’ attitudes toward physician involvement in family conference. J Fam Pract 1989; 28: 73–78.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Kushner K, Meyer D: Family physicians’ perceptions of the family conference. J Fam Pract 1989; 28: 65–68.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Morisky DE, Levine DM, Green LW, Shapiro S, Russel RP, Smith CR: Five year blood pressure control and mortality following health education for hypertensive patients. Am J Public Health 1983; 73: 153–162.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Bauman MH: Involving resistant family members in therapy. In Gurman AS (ed.): Questions and Answers in the Practice of Family Therapy. New York: Brunner/Mazel, 1981.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Garfield R: Convening the family: Guidelines for the initial contact with a family member. In Gurman AS (ed.): Questions and Answers in the Practice of Family Therapy. New York: Brunner/Mazel, 1981.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Starr S: Dealing with common resistance to attending the first family therapy session. In Gurman AS (ed.): Questions and Answers in the Practice of Family Therapy. New York: Brunner/Mazel, 1981.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Stanton MD, Todd TC: Engaging “resistant” families in treatment: Principles and techniques in recruitment. Fam Proc 1981; 20: 261–293.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Susan H. McDaniel
    • 1
  • Thomas L. Campbell
    • 1
  • David B. Seaburn
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Medicine and Highland Hospital, Jacob B. Holler Family Medicine CenterUniversity of RochesterRochesterUSA

Personalised recommendations