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Trends in Legislation and Case Law on Child Abuse and Neglect

  • Randy K. Otto
  • Gary B. Melton
Chapter

Abstract

The recognition of child abuse and neglect as a significant social problem in the United States is a relatively recent development. Although most states had passed specific child maltreatment laws by the early 1920s, it was not until publication of a 1962 article describing the “battered-child syndrome” (Kempe, Silverman, Steele, Droegenmuller, & Silverman, 1962) that legislators and health care professionals paid considerable attention to the problem of child abuse and neglect. Since then, there have been several waves of legislation and judicial activity that have been nearly universal in American jurisdictions but that seldom have had unequivocally positive effects.

Keywords

Sexual Abuse Child Abuse Child Sexual Abuse Criminal Process Criminal Prosecution 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Randy K. Otto
    • 1
  • Gary B. Melton
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Law and Mental Health, Florida Mental Health InstituteUniversity of South FloridaTampaUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyUniversity of Nebraska-LincolnLincolnUSA

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