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The Cutaneous Circulation

  • John M. Johnson
Part of the Developments in Cardiovascular Medicine book series (DICM, volume 107)

Abstract

Laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) is the latest of a large number of methods designed to study the cutaneous circulation. Theoretical analysis predicts a correspondence of LDF to tissue blood flow, and mechanical/hydraulic models support this prediction (see chapters 2–6). However, because each of these is necessarily idealized with respect to the actual movement of blood in tissue, experimental confirmation is required. This chapter considers the correspondence of LDF with other measures of skin blood flow, the depth of measurement of blood flow in skin by LDF, and examples of uses of LDF that take advantage of its unique attributes.

Keywords

Laser Doppler Flowmetry Skin Blood Flow Reactive Hyperemia Forearm Blood Flow Muscle Blood Flow 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • John M. Johnson

There are no affiliations available

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