Advertisement

Acute Renal Failure Following Bilateral Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy Without Ureteral Obstruction

  • Ray H. Littleton
  • Marc Melser
  • Warren Kupin

Abstract

Permanent renal damage following extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) of renal calculi has not been reported. However, several studies have shown that temporary acute functional and morphologic changes can be noted immediately after ESWL treatment. Shock wave therapy has been directly associated with the development of intrarenal hematomas, interstitial edema, and temporary tubular dysfunction. The occurrence of reversible acute tubular necrosis following bilateral, simultaneous ESWL therapy in a nonobstructive system is herein reported.

Keywords

Shock Wave Shock Wave Lithotripsy Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy Ureteral Obstruction Excretory Urography 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Drach GW, Dretler SP, Fair WR, et al: Report of the United States cooperative study of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. J Urol 135: 1127, 1986.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Lingeman JE, Newman DM, Mertz JHO, et al: Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy: the Methodist Hospital of Indiana experience. J Urol 135: 1134, 1986.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Kaude JV, Williams CM, Millner MR, et al: Renal morphology and function immediately after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. Amer J Roentgen 145: 305, 1985.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Lingeman JE, McAteer JA, Kempson SA, et al: Bioeffects of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. J Endourol 1: 89, 1987.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Newman RC, Bezirdjian L, Steinbock G, et al: Complications of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy: prevention and treatment. Seminars Urol 4: 170, 1986.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Rubin JI, Arger P, Pollack HM, et al: Kidney changes after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy: CT evaluation. Radiology 162: 21, 1987.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Coptcoat MJ, Webb Dr, Kellett MJ, et al: The complications of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy: management and prevention. BrJ Urol 38: 578, 1986.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Baumgartner BR, Dickey KW, Ambrose SS, et al: Kidney changes after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy: appearance on MR imaging. Radiology 163: 531, 1987.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Williams CM, Kaude JV, Newman RC, et al: Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy: longterm complications. AJR 150: 311, 1988.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Marcellan FJR and Servio LI: Evolution of renal damage in extracorporeal lithotripsy by shock wave. Eur Urol 12: 173, 1986.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Myers BD and Moran SM: Hemodynamically mediated acute renal failure. NEJM 314: 97, 1986.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Anderson RJ, Linus SL, Berns AS, et al: Nonoliguric acute renal failure. NEJM 296: 1134, 1977.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Schrier RW: Acute renal failure: pathogenesis, diagnoses and management. Hospital Practice 16: 93, 1981.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Hunter PT, Finlayson B, Hirko RJ, et al: Measurement of shock wave pressures used for lithotripsy. J Urol 136: 733, 1986.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Russo P, Stephenson RA, Mies C, et al: High energy shock waves suppress tumor growth in vitro and in vivo. J Urol 135: 626, 1986.Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    Russo P, Mies C, Huryk R, et al: Histopathologic and ultrastructural correlates of tumor growth suppression by high energy shock wave. J Urol 137: 338, 1987.PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ray H. Littleton
    • 1
  • Marc Melser
    • 1
  • Warren Kupin
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of UrologyHenry Ford HospitalDetroitUSA
  2. 2.Department of Nephrology and HypertensionHenry Ford HospitalDetroitUSA

Personalised recommendations