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Nephrotoxicity pp 527-534 | Cite as

Light Hydrocarbon-Induced Nephrotoxicity: the Interaction of 2,2,4-Trimethylpentane with Alpha-2U-Globulin in the Male Rat Kidney

  • E. A. Lock
  • M. Charbonneau
  • J. Strasser
  • J. A. Swenberg
  • J. S. Bus

Abstract

Inhalation exposure to unleaded gasoline for 2 years has been shown to produce a small increase in the incidence of renal tumours (adenomas and adenocarcinomas) in male Fischer 344 rats, but not in female rats or mice of either sex (MacFarland, 1984; Kitchen, 1984). Following subchronic inhalation exposure of unleaded gasoline to male rats, nephrotoxicity occurred and was characterised by an increase in protein (hyaline) droplets in proximal convoluted tubules (Haider et al, 1984), the accumulation of casts at the cortico-medullary junction and single cell necrosis and regeneration of the nephron (Short et al, 1987). Autoradiographic analyses of various segments of the nephron, following continuous administration of [ H]-thymidine via osmotic pumps, showed a dose-related increase in cell turnover in the P2 segment (Short et al, 1987). Thus unleaded gasoline produces nephrotoxicity in the male rat following subchronic exposure. Various light hydrocarbon mixtures and individual branched-chain saturated hydrocarbon components of these mixtures, such as 2,2,4-trimethylpentane (TMP), have been shown to produce similar nephrotoxic effects (Haider et al, 1985; Stonard et al, 1986; Short et al, 1986; Phillips and Egan, 1984 and, Viau et al, 1986). In addition, other chemicals such as decalin (Alden et al, 1984) and 1,4-dichlorobenzene (Charbonneau, 1987b) also produce the nephropathy.

Keywords

Toxicity Adenocarcinoma Hydrocarbon Adenoma Fractionation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. A. Lock
    • 1
  • M. Charbonneau
    • 2
  • J. Strasser
    • 2
  • J. A. Swenberg
    • 2
  • J. S. Bus
    • 2
  1. 1.Central Toxicology LaboratoryImperial Chemical Industries PLCCheshireUK
  2. 2.Chemical Industries Institute of ToxicologyResearch Triangle ParkUSA

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