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Historical Perspective on Cadmium-Induced Nephrotoxicity

  • Vera R. Porter
  • Dora B. Weiner

Abstract

Cadmium is a critical element for advancement of our industrial society, where it is used in alkaline batteries, alloys, paints, plastics, photographic supplies, antiseptics and other products (9,25). By recognizing the toxicity of cadmium it has been possible to limit exposure to this element while benefiting from its many products. This paper will trace the history of the predominant toxic manifestation of cadmium exposure, i.e. nephrotoxicity, as a model for understanding how its pathology and aetiology were recognized. It will become apparent that our understanding of a comparatively “modern” disease can shed light on prior observations of the pathological processes of nephrotoxicity.

Keywords

Zinc Toxicity Dust Mercury Cobalt 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vera R. Porter
    • 1
  • Dora B. Weiner
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, School of MedicineUniversity of CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA

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