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Nephrotoxicity pp 113-118 | Cite as

In-Vivo Bone Lead Measurements and Renal Effects

  • H. J. Mason
  • L. J. Somervaille
  • D. R. Tennant
  • D. R. Chettle
  • M. C. Scott

Abstract

Reports that both chronic and acute exposure to lead (Pb) could cause nephropathy were first published in the middle of the last century. Recent epidemiological, clinical and biochemical studies still suggest that excessive Pb uptake can be related to renal disease or dysfunction (1,2) . The ubiquitous nature of Pb in the modern environment and the number of workers occupationally exposed to the metal suggest that an understanding of the dose-effect relationships is important . However the relationships between various parameters of functional or morphological changes in the kidney, the development of clinical renal disease and estimates of the Pb dose still remain unclear.

Keywords

Filtration Albumin Hydroxyl EDTA Cadmium 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. J. Mason
    • 1
  • L. J. Somervaille
    • 2
  • D. R. Tennant
    • 1
  • D. R. Chettle
    • 2
  • M. C. Scott
    • 2
  1. 1.Health and Safety ExecutiveLondonUK
  2. 2.Department of PhysicsUniversity of BirminghamBirminghamUK

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