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Behavior of Membrane Guanine-Nucleotide Binding Proteins as Signal Transducers

  • Michio Ui
  • Toshiaki Katada

Abstract

Most of the extracellular signal substances (neurotransmitters, hormones, autacoids, etc) interact with particular receptor sites on the plasma membrane of mammalian cells that produce intracellular signals (or second messengers) in response to these first messengers. The membrane receptor systems are now known to be mostly composed of three protein components, i.e., receptors, transducers and the effectors that are enzymes or ion channels directly or indirectly responsible for the generation of second messengers. All the transducers so far identified are guanine-nucleotide binding proteins currently abbreviated as G proteins.

Keywords

Adenylate Cyclase Muscarinic Receptor Cholera Toxin Guanine Nucleotide Pertussis Toxin 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michio Ui
    • 1
  • Toshiaki Katada
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Physiological Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmaceutical SciencesUniversity of TokyoTokyo 113Japan
  2. 2.Faculty of Science Tokyo Institute of TechnologyDepartment of Life ScienceYokohoma 227Japan

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