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From Egg Surveys to Ecosystem Models: Biological Assumptions in Fisheries Management

  • Marc Mangel
  • William W. FoxJr.
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes on Coastal and Estuarine Studies book series (COASTAL, volume 28)

Abstract

Tbe biological assumptions associated witb fishery management are discussed within tbe framework of three problems of increasing complexity. The first is the use of egg or larval surveys to estimate spawning biom ass and the associated questions about modelling aggregation. The second is management of krill in the Antarctic and the relationship between catch per unit effort and stock abundance. Tbe importance of behavioral models in fishery management is discussed. The third topic is the management of multiple pelagic species in California coastal waters and the need for the development of community ecology models for the California Current.

Keywords

Fishery Management Unit Effort Antarctic Krill California Current Stock Abundance 
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marc Mangel
    • 1
  • William W. FoxJr.
    • 2
  1. 1.Departments of Agricultural Economics, Entomology and MathematicsUniversity of CaliforniaDavisUSA
  2. 2.Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric ScienceUniversity of MiamiMiamiUSA

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