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Surgical Problems

  • George F. Snell

Abstract

In preparing a physician for the practice of family medicine, training and experience in surgery and some of its subspecialties are important essentials for completeness. Some family physicians will not do operating room or office surgery, but they still need exposure to clinical surgery, because it is more than just a technical therapeutic modality. Certain data-handling and problem-solving skills are necessary for all physicians who treat patients of all ages and with any organ system problem.

Keywords

Inguinal Hernia Family Physician Anal Canal Peripheral Arterial Disease Anal Fissure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • George F. Snell

There are no affiliations available

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