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The Application of Gels in Enhanced Oil Recovery: Theory, Polymers and Crosslinker Systems

  • A. Moradi-Araghi
  • D. H. Beardmore
  • G. A. Stahl
Chapter

Abstract

A great deal has been written about the flooding of reservoirs with polymer solutions. The augmentation of a waterflood with water-soluble polymers permits a more controlled flow of fluids through the reservoir. The result is improved volumetric displacement efficiency, and more economical removal of the oil unproducible in the primary recovery step. The injection of a large volume aqueous polymer solution is capital intensive, and often requires a long time to produce the results. A commonly employed option is the placement of a gelable solution in the more permeable zones or fractures in the reservoir, away from the well bore, that is allowed to have sufficient time to gelation. This method, which is referred to as profile control, is relatively inexpensive and often is paid for by the first few months of incremental oil. Although in-situ gelation is often used for diverting the flow of driving fluids in injection wells, it is also used to stop or reduce the flow of water into producing wells to result in lower lifting, processing, and disposal costs. In this paper the application of gelled polymers in EOR will be discussed. Close attention will be given to polymers and crosslinking systems.

Keywords

Well Bore Gelation Time United States Patent Profile Modification Hydrolyze Polyacrylamide 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Moradi-Araghi
    • 1
  • D. H. Beardmore
    • 1
  • G. A. Stahl
    • 1
  1. 1.Phillips Research CenterPhillips Petroleum CompanyBartlesvilleUSA

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