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Abstract

When one is asked, “Could one make a machine to play chess?” there are several possible meanings which might be given to the words. Here are a few-
  1. (a)

    Could one make a machine which would obey the rules of chess, i. e. one which would play random legal moves, or which could tell one whether a given move is a legal one?

     
  2. (b)

    Could one make a machine which would solve chess problems, e. g. tell one whether, in a given position, white has a forced mate in three?

     
  3. (c)

    Could one make a machine which would play a reasonably good game of chess, i. e. which, confronted with an ordinary (that is, not particularly unusual) chess position, would after two or three minutes of calculation, indicate a passably good legal move?

     
  4. (d)

    Could one make a machine to play chess, and to improve its play, game by game, profiting from its experience?

     

To these we may add two further questions, unconnected with chess, which are likely to be on the tip of the reader’s tongue.

Keywords

Electronic Computer Legal Move Defence Minister Weak Player Considerable Move 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© David Levy 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alan M. Turing

There are no affiliations available

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