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The Personal Information Center

  • Joshua Lederberg

Abstract

Early in his residency at the Boston City Hospital, Harold Jeghers (codiscoverer of the Peutz-Jeghers syndrome) was prompted by a case on his service to review the publications on herpes zoster. The attending physician, after having heard this young resident’s detailed review, asked him to discuss that subject at medical rounds. Jeghers, pleased that his review enabled him to lead an important discussion soon after beginning his residency, was motivated to develop a personal library that would give him quick access to medical information. He subsequently became a pioneer in development of the personal information center. Joseph Van Der Meulen attests to the success of Jegher’s methods; the best informed physicians he knows were trained by Jeghers to organize and use a personal reprint file.

Keywords

Herpes Zoster Rheumatic Heart Disease Central Index Index Issue Medical Library 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joshua Lederberg
    • 1
  1. 1.The Rockefeller UniversityNew YorkUSA

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