Advertisement

Fossil Fuel Combustion: Recent Amounts, Patterns, and Trends of CO2

  • Ralph M. Rotty
  • Gregg Marland

Abstract

Several types of human activity have introduced perturbations that impinge on the natural global carbon cycle. During the past century or so, one of the major perturbations has been the release of carbon from long-term storage through the combustion of fossil fuels. During the next 100 years fossil fuel use will almost certainly be the major source causing increased levels of CO2 in the atmosphere.

Keywords

Fossil Fuel United Nations Liquid Fuel Fossil Fuel Combustion Coke Plant 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Carter, C. O. 1979. What world crude analyses imply. Hydrocarbon Processing. 103–108.Google Scholar
  2. Marland, G., and R. M. Rotty. 1983. Carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuels: a procedure for estimation and results for 1950–1981. TR-003. Carbon Dioxide Research Division, Office of Energy Research, U.S. Department of Energy, DOE/NBB-0036.Google Scholar
  3. United Nations. 1982. 1980 Yearbook of World Energy Statistics. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs, Statistical Office.Google Scholar
  4. United Nations. 1983. 1981 Yearbook of World Energy Statistics. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs, Statistical Office.Google Scholar
  5. United Nations Environment Programme. 1979. The environmental impacts of production and use of energy, Part I, Fossil Fuels. ERS-1–79, Nairobi.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ralph M. Rotty
  • Gregg Marland

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations