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Thirty Years of Antipsychotic Drug Analysis

  • Stephen H. Curry
Part of the Methodological Surveys in Biochemistry and Analysis book series (MSBA, volume 16 A)

Abstract

Interest in measurement of psychotropic drugs in biological fluids dates back to -1955, soon after the introduction of chlorpromazine into psychiatry [1]. It was quickly realized that studies of chlorpromazine in regard to its disposition and metabolism, and detection in urine as a means of assessing compliance, would be useful [2]. Early attempts involved UV spectrophotometry and colorimetry, with or without prior derivatization [3]. However, it was not till GC-ECD was applied that sufficient sensitivity for plasma was achieved [4, 5]. Over the years, nitrogen detectors, mass spectrometry (MS) and liquid chromatography have been used [6–12]. Basically* the strategy has had to continuously evolve to keep up with knowledge about metabolites of the drugs concerned [13–20].

Benzodiazepine analysis has been relatively straightforward [21, 22]. Most benzodiazepines are amenable to GC-ECD, offsetting the reZativeZy limited applicability of HPLC. Generally benzodiazepines are not so beset with the problems of non-separability of drugs from one another, and drugs from metabolites, as are phenothiazines and tricyclic antidepressants. TricycZics were initially measured by isotope derivatization techniques [ 23], needing prior specific extraction of the drug. GC-NPD was later applied; but again, HPLC with UV-absorption or fluorescence detection has provided a solution to most problems.

Keywords

Parent Drug Psychotropic Drug Tertiary Amine Amine Oxide Prior Derivatization 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephen H. Curry
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Clinical Pharmacokinetics, College of PharmacyUniversity of FloridaGainesvilleUSA

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