Human Rights and the Rights of Mental Patients

  • Helmut E. Ehrhardt


The desire to catalogue or codify rules of conduct for the individual — in particular, moral standards governing the way he lives with others in his community — is of very ancient origin. In Western civilization, the earliest and best known example of such a codex is the Decalogue of the Old Testament, the latest effort is the Universal Declaration of Human Rights adopted by the General Assembly of the UN in 1948. The effects of two world wars had fundamentally affected the confidence in our traditional value system, and the global need for a new orientation had become evident. Even at the time of the League of Nations, standards for the protection of human rights were laid down only in national constitutions.


Universal Declaration Mental Patient Involuntary Admission Hippocratic Oath Special Tribunal 


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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Helmut E. Ehrhardt
    • 1
  1. 1.University of MarburgMarburgGermany

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