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Cardiology pp 337-346 | Cite as

High Density Lipoproteins and Atherosclerosis

  • A. N. Klimov

Abstract

The change in the ratio between lipoprotein (LP) concentration with the density higher or lower than 1.063 g/ml was first observed in patients with ischemic heart disease as early as 19511. Later Gofman et al.2 also pointed to the increased blood concentration of low density lipoproteins (LDLP) and decreased content of high density LP (HDLP) in patients with clinical atherosclerosis. However, at that time attention was paid to the increasing level of LP in atherosclerosis leaving in shade the low levels of LP.

Keywords

Bile Acid High Density Lipoprotein Hepatic Lipase Aortic Smooth Muscle Cell Endothelial Lipase 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. N. Klimov
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Experimental MedicineLeningradUSSR

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