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Diet and Risk Factor Modification in the Elderly

  • Elizabeth L. Scheer
  • Rebecca Givens
Part of the Developments in Cardiovascular Medicine book series (DICM, volume 31)

Abstract

Preventive health care, long the cornerstone of pediatric medical care, has come of age. Today, an expanding emphasis is being placed on prevention of disease throughout a person’s entire life. As a result, more people now are attaining advanced age than at any previous time. Contributing to the increase in longevity has been the recent dramatic decline in cardiovascular mortality over the last decade [1–3]. Since 1969 life expectancy has increased two years for both men and women and reached a peak of 73.8 years, a total population longevity increase of 3.1 years since 1970 [4]. The reasons for this trend are multiple and include medical advances, preventative measures, and changes in life-style. The conclusion that this trend supports is unequivocal however: cardiovascular disease is not an inevitable consequence of aging or genetic make-up alone. It can be prevented by reduction of those risk factors associated with the development of cardiovascular disease. Although not all risk factors for cardiovascular disease can be changed, major risk factors that are amenable include cigarette smoking, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, obesity, and diabetes mellitus (figure 12-1) [5–7].

Keywords

Ideal Weight Coronary Heart Disease Mortality Risk Factor Modification American Dietetic Association Enhance Patient Compliance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Elizabeth L. Scheer
  • Rebecca Givens

There are no affiliations available

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