Mechanisms and Kinetics of Pollutant Formation during Reaction of Pulverized Coal

  • Philip C. Malte
  • Dee P. Rees

Abstract

Pollutants arising from the reaction of pulverized coal can be divided into two classifications. The first classification includes pollutants common to all industrial combustion systems: CO, UHC (unburned hydrocarbons), soot, and NO x due to the fixation of atmospheric N2. The second classification includes pollutants formed from the impurities in coal. Sulfurous and nitrogenous pollutant gases and flyash dominate this classification. Other pollutant impurities are chlorine, fluorine, and traces of toxic metals.

Keywords

Furnace Sulfide Steam Ozone Hydrocarbon 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • Philip C. Malte
    • 1
  • Dee P. Rees
    • 2
  1. 1.Mechanical EngineeringWashington State UniversityPullmanUSA
  2. 2.Chemical EngineeringBrigham Young UniversityProvoUSA

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