Wildlife Disease Curricula in North American Universities

  • T. Wilson

Abstract

A brief review of the history of the Wildlife Disease Association is presented, together with a discussion of the various institutions in North America offering training in wildlife diseases. In tabular form, a list of these institutions and their specialty is enumerated. It is stressed that the future positive development in the field of Wildlife Diseases is represented by quality in education.

Zusammenfassung

Geboten wird: eine kurze Uebersicht des Werdegangs der Vereinigung fuer Wildkrankheiten (Wildlife Disease Association); eine Eroerterung der verschiedenen Anstalten Nordamerikas, die Ausbildung in Wildkrankheiten bieten; eine tabellenfoermige Liste dieser Anstalten und deren Specialitaet. Es wird hervorgehoben, dass die zukuenftige positive Entwicklung auf dem Gebiet der Wildkrankheiten von der Qualitaet der Ausbildung abhaengig ist.

Today education, research, clinical medicine, and diagnostic pathology activities in the area of wildlife diseases are vigorously thriving specialties with everwidening horizons.

In 1951, a small group of North American wildlife specialists met and formed a committee on wildlife diseases. This medical specialty rapidly gathered an enthusiastic following in North America, and in a few years the Wildlife Disease Association was formed. Today the Association, with an established position in the scientific community, has over 1,000 members from all aspects of the international scientific community.16

It is of interest to consider the reasons for progress in any medical specialty, and it would be realistic to consider that the development in the field of Wildlife Diseases has been due to the activities of men and women with great scientific acumen and enthusiasm who have consequently attracted, trained, and moulded. outstanding students of this specialty.

Drs. L. Karstad, C. Herman, S. Sniezko, and D. Trainer, past recipients of the Wildlife Disease Association, Distinguished Service Award, 1, 3, 4 are examples of the scientific excellence and enthusiasm that has permitted the vigorous growth and positive development of the Wildlife Disease specialty in North America. Drs. A. McDiarmid, K. Borg, H. Reichenbach-Klinke, and B. Hunday, and many others have encouraged the specialty of wildlife diseases on a large international scope. No doubt the future development in the field of Wildlife Diseases rests with the education and motivation of competent personnel.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. Wilson
    • 1
  1. 1.Pan American Health OrganizationBridgetownUSA

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