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Improving Urban Infrastructure Planning and Investment: The World Bank Experience

  • John M. Courtney

Abstract

Urban development and the overall economic development of a country are interconnected. Cities make vital contributions to economic growth. Although the urban population of developing countries usually accounts for between 20 and 40 per cent of the population, well over 50 per cent of the gross national product is produced in cities and towns. By the year 2000, the average is projected to rise to 67 per cent, and 80 per cent of the annual increment to GNP is expected to be from urban areas. If a country’s cities and towns are inefficient, then the economy is inefficient, and economic recovery and longer-term development are limited.

Keywords

Financial Management Urban Infrastructure Investment Program Urban Service Municipal Infrastructure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Bibliography

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • John M. Courtney
    • 1
  1. 1.The World BankUSA

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