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Introduction to the Basic Concepts in Reaction Dynamics

  • J. L. Houben
Part of the Progress in Mathematics book series (NSSA)

Abstract

As has already been discussed (1), the efficiency and specificity of enzyme catalysis are currently interpreted as being due to a combination of factors, including:
  • the interplay between the flexibility and the rigidity of the enzyme structure;

  • the adaptation of the fluctuation time scale to the chemical reaction;

  • the preparation of very specific transient species.

Keywords

Potential Surface Vibrational State Enzyme Catalysis Potential Curve Transition State Theory 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Reference

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    A. Cooper, J.L. Houben: Enzyme catalysis: A physical chemist’s description, in the present volume.Google Scholar
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    The vibrational temperature is the energy of the vibrational state expressed in kT units.Google Scholar
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    T. Fonseca, J.A.N.F. Gomes, P. Grigolini, F. Marchesoni: The theory of chemical reaction, p. 389 in: “Memory approaches to stochastic processes in condensed matter,” M. Evans, P. Grigolini and G. Pastori Parravicini (eds.), in Adv. Chem. Phys., Vol. 62, I. Prigogine and S. Rice (Gen. eds.), J. Wiley, New York (1985).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. L. Houben
    • 1
  1. 1.Istituto di Chimica Quantistica ed Energetica MolecolareConsiglio Nazionale delle RicerchePisaItaly

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