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Areal Linguistics in North America

  • Joel Sherzer

Abstract

At a conference on the Universals of language held in 1961, Roman Jakobson (1966: 274) stated that:

We most urgently need a systematic world-wide mapping of linguistic structural properties: distinctive features, inherent and prosodic — their types of concurrence and concatenation; grammatical concepts and the principles of their expression. The primary and less difficult task would be to prepare a phonemic atlas of the world.

Keywords

Culture Area Great Basin Language Family Northwest Coast Person Plural 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1976

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  • Joel Sherzer

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