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The Hydrosilylation Cure of Polyisobutene

  • C. W. Macosko
  • J. C. Saam

Abstract

A liquid polyisobutene oligomer with unsaturated chain ends undergoes hydrosilylation with HMe2SiOMe2SiOMe2SiH or Si(OMe2SiH)4 to give higher molecular weight polymers or elastomers. A major side reaction consumes SiH to give redistributed siloxane in the resulting polymers and gaseous silanes and siloxanes as by-products. A second side reaction results in loss of reactivity in the oligomer due to a shift of the terminal double bond to an internal position. If the side reactions are taken into account, it is possible to forecast quantitatively molecular weight, gel point and modulus from the conversions of →SiH, >C=CH2 and the chain entanglement concentration reported for polyisobutene in the literature.

Keywords

Side Reaction Internal Position Entanglement Concentration Terminal Double Bond Small Strain Shear Modulus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. W. Macosko
    • 1
  • J. C. Saam
    • 2
  1. 1.Dept. of Chemical Engr.& Materials ScienceUnv. of MinnesotaMinneapolisUSA
  2. 2.Dow Corning Corp.MidlandUSA

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