Advertisement

The Pig as an Animal Model for Purine Metabolic Studies

  • J. S. Cameron
  • H. A. Simmonds
  • P. J. Hatfield
  • A. S. Jones
  • A. Cadenhead
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 41 B)

Abstract

Small laboratory rodents have many disadvantages for the study of purine metabolism in relation to human disease. They normally pass their purine metabolites in much smaller volumes of urine both in relation to bodyweight and filtration rate (1); in addition, the distribution of enzymes of purine catabolism in these species differs from man (2,3). The pig in contrast has a kidney which structurally and functionally resembles human kidneys closely (4,5), and the distribution of xanthine oxidase and guanase is similar to man (2,3). Because of these advantages, and the finding of “guanine gout” in pigs (6), we studied purine metabolism in this animal (7). The pig has proved a much better model.

Keywords

Human Disease Small Volume Filtration Rate Therapeutic Dose Xanthine Oxidase 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. 1.
    Hitchings, G.H. (1966). Ann. Rheum. Dis., 25, 601.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Al-Khalidi, U.A.S., Chaglassian, T.H. (1965). Biochem. J., 97, 318.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Levine, R., Hall, T.C., Harris, C.A. (1963). Cancer, 16, 269.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Nielsen, T.W., Maaske, C.A., Booth, N.H. (1966). In: Swine in Biochemical Research, Bustad, L.K., McLellan, R.O. (Eds). Bartel Memorial Trust, p.529.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Farebrother, D.A., Hatfield, P.J., Simmonds, H.A., Cameron, J.S., Jones, A.S., Cadenhead, A. In preparation.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Virchow, R. (1866). Virchow’s Arch. Path. Anat. Physiol., 35, 358.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Simmonds, H.A., Hatfield, P.J., Cameron, J.S., Jones, A.S., Cadenhead, A. (1973). Biochem. Pharmacol. In press.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Simmonds, H.A., Rising, T.J., Cadenhead, A., Hatfield, P.J., Jones, A.S., Cameron, J.S. (1973). Biochem. Pharmacol. In press.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Elion, G.B., Kovensky, A., Hitchings, G.H., Metz, E., Ründles, R.W. (1966). Biochem. Pharmacol., 15, 863.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1974

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. S. Cameron
    • 1
    • 2
  • H. A. Simmonds
    • 1
    • 2
  • P. J. Hatfield
    • 1
    • 2
  • A. S. Jones
    • 1
    • 2
  • A. Cadenhead
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Guy’s Hospital and Rowett Research InstituteLondonUK
  2. 2.Guy’s Hospital and Rowett Research InstituteBucksburn, AberdeenshireUK

Personalised recommendations