Acetaldehyde and Acetate Production during Ethanol Metabolism in Perfused Rat Liver

  • T. J. Braggins
  • K. E. Crow
  • R. D. Batt

Abstract

It has been reported that, in isolated perfused liver metabolizing 16 or 32 mM ethanol, as much as 60% of acetaldehyde formed from ethanol left the liver unmetabolized (Lindros et al., 1972). Krebs (1969) found that sufficient acetaldehyde was formed during perfusion with 10 mM ethanol to bring the alcohol dehydrogenase reaction into equilibrium. By contrast, Williamson et al. (1969) found that only trace amounts of acetaldehyde were released by livers metabolising 10 mM ethanol. Eriksson et al. (1975) have claculated that, in vivo, less that 5% of acetaldehyde formed from ethanol leaves the liver un-metabolized. This is so even in the presence of ethanol concentrations as high as 50 μmol/g wet wt. liver (Eriksson and Sippel, 1977).

Keywords

Albumin Propionaldehyde Heparin Aldehyde Pyruvate 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Cornell, N. W., Crow, K. E., Leadbetter, M. G. and Veech, R. L., 1977, Rate determining factors for ethanol oxidation in rats in vivo and in isolated rat hepatocytes, in: “Proceedings of the Workshop on Alcohol and Nutrition,”Indianapolis.Google Scholar
  2. Crow, K. E., Cornell, N. W. and Veech, R. L., 1977, The role of alcohol dehydrogenase in governing rates of ethanol metabolism in rats, in: “Alcohol and Aldehyde Metabolising Systems,” R. G. Thurman, J. R. Williamson, H. Drott and B. Chance, eds., Vol. I II, Academic Press, New York.Google Scholar
  3. Dickinson, F. M. and Dalziel, K., 1967, The specificities and configurations of ternary complexes of yeast and liver alcohol dehydrogenases, Biochem. J., 104:165–172.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. Eriksson, C. J. P., 1973, Ethanol and acetaldehyde metabolism in rats genetically selected for their ethanol preference, Biochem. Pharmacol., 22:2283–2292.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Eriksson, C. J. P., Marselos, M. and Koivula, T., 1975, The role of cytosolic rat liver aldehyde dehydrogenase in the oxidation of acetaldehyde during ethanol metabolism in vivo, Biochem. J., 152:709–712.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. Eriksson, C. J. P. and Sippel, H. W., 1977, The distribution and metabolism of acetaldehyde in rats during ethanol oxidation-1,Biochem. Pharmacol., 26:241–247.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Guynn, R. W. and Veech, R. L., 1974, Direct determination of acetate in tissue extracts in the presence of labile acetate esters, Analyt. Biochem., 61:6–15PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Hems, R., Ross, B. D., Berry, M. N. and Krebs, H. A., 1966, Gluconeogenesis in the perfused rat liver, Biochem. J., 101:284–292.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. Krebs, H. A., 1969, The role of equilibria in the regulation of metabolism, in: “Current Topics in Cellular Regulation 1,” B. L. Horecker and E. R. Stadtman, eds., Academic Press, New York.Google Scholar
  10. Lindros, K. 0., 1974, Acetaldehyde oxidation and its role in the overall metabolic effects of ethanol in the liver, in: “Regulation of Hepatic Metabolism,” F. Lundquist and N. Tygstrup, eds., Academic Press, New York.Google Scholar
  11. Lindros, K. 0., 1975, Regulatory factors in hepatic acetaldehyde metabolism during ethanol oxidation, in: “The Role of Acetaldehyde in the Actions of Ethanol,” K. O. Lindros and C. J. P. Eriksson, eds., Finnish Foundation for Alcohol Studies, Helsinki.Google Scholar
  12. Lindros, K. 0. and Eriksson, C. J. P., 1974, Acceleration of ethanol oxidation by propionaldehyde in the perfused rat liver, in:“Alcohol and Aldehyde Metabolising Systems,” R. G. Thurman, T. Yonetani, J. R. Williamson and B. Chance, eds., Vol. I, Academic Press, New York.Google Scholar
  13. Lindros, K. 0., Vihma, R. and Forsander, 0. A., 1972, Utilisation and metabolic effects of acetaldehyde and ethanol in the perfused rat liver, Biochem. J., 126: 945–952.Google Scholar
  14. Nishiki, K., Chance, B. and Morris, M. A., 1977, Acetaldehyde oxidation by isolated hepatic aldehyde dehydrogenase, mitochondria and parenchymal cells, and by perfused intact liver of the rat, in: “Alcohol and Aldehyde Metabolising Systems,”Vol. I II, R. G. Thurman, J. R. Williamson, H. R. Drott and B. Chance, eds., Academic Press, New York.Google Scholar
  15. Seiden, H., Israel, Y. and Kalant, H., 1974, Activation of ethanol metabolism by 2,4-dinitrophenol in the isolated perfused rat liver, Biochem. Pharmacol., 23:2337–2339.Google Scholar
  16. Stowell, A. R., Crow, K. E., Greenway, R. M. and Batt, R. D., 1978, Determination of acetaldehyde in blood using automated distillation and fluorometry, Anal. Biochem, 84:384–392.Google Scholar
  17. Stowell, A. R., Greenway, R. M. and Batt, R. D., 1977, Acetaldehyde formation during deproteinisation of human blood samples containing ethanol, Biochem. Med., 18:392–401.Google Scholar
  18. Thurman, R. G., McKenna, W. R. and McCaffrey, T. B., 1976, Pathways responsible for the adaptive increase in ethanol utilisation following chronic treatment with ethanol: inhibitor studies with the hemoglobin-free perfused rat liver, Mol. Pharmacol., 12: 156–166.Google Scholar
  19. Williamson, J. R., Scholz, R., Browning, E. T., Thurman, R. G. and Fukami, M. H., 1969, Metabolic effects of ethanol in the perfused rat liver, J. Biol. Chem., 244:5044–5054.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. J. Braggins
    • 1
  • K. E. Crow
    • 1
  • R. D. Batt
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Chemistry, Biochemistry and BiophysicsMassey UniversityPalmerston NorthNew Zealand

Personalised recommendations