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An Analysis of the Literature on Tire-Road Skid Resistance

  • K. C. Ludema
  • B. D. Gujrati

Abstract

Over the last 20 years there has been an exponential rise in the number of reports in the area of Tire-Road Skid Resistance. In a recent publication*, the authors surveyed the major findings and conclusions on this subject up to 1970. The present paper is a summary of that publication: it is designed to assist one in quickly becoming acquainted with the significant findings and landmark publications on the many different aspects of Tire-Road Skid Resistance research.

Keywords

Road Surface Rubber Chemistry Highway Research Skid Resistance Bituminous Binder 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1974

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. C. Ludema
    • 1
  • B. D. Gujrati
    • 1
  1. 1.University of MichiganUSA

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